The Flayed Man

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Published 18 January 2018 | A Game of Thrones: The Card Game

The Flayed Man

Kingsmoot Is Now Available for A Game of Thrones: The Card Game

“Roose Bolton is our Warden of the North. He will deal with Stannis.”
  
–Cersei Lannister, A Feast for Crows

The history of A Song of Ice and Fire is filled with monsters—from the reign of Maegor the Cruel, through Mad King Aerys, up to characters like Ser Gregor Clegane, Joffrey Baratheon, and Ramsay Snow. Still, in A Game of Thrones: The Card Game, you have the chance to take these despicable characters and make them your monsters, helping you win the Iron Throne and claim victory over your opponents. The next chapter of A Game of Thrones: The Card Game arrives in Kingsmoot, the third Chapter Pack of the Flight of Crows cycle, now available at your local retailer or online through our webstore!

Kingsmoot continues the themes and traditions of the game’s fourth cycle by continuing to add fuel to the bestow keyword and new ways for you to place gold on your characters and impact the game. Sixty new cards (three copies each of twenty distinct cards) make their debut in this expansion, and among them, you’ll find Lyseni pirates, Dothraki handmaidens, Dornish knights, and outlaws from the Brotherhood Without Banners. With a rich assortment of new tactics and strategies to introduce into your decks, this Chapter Pack finds a home in any player’s collection.

Into the Dreadfort

The increasing presence of the bestow keyword is one of the major motifs that can be found throughout the Flight of Crows cycle, but it’s not the only one. This newest cycle of cards also rewards players for forging alliances between the Great Houses, and finding new uses for the Banner agendas found in the game’s Core Set. Though both cards can be brought in line with fealty to House Stark, the House Bolton cards in Kingsmoot are the latest entry in this cycle’s theme of bringing the factions together.

Ramsay Snow (Kingsmoot, 41) is a monster in any sense of the word, and he’s not choosy about where he inflicts suffering. In fact, when this character enters play, both players must immediately sacrifice a character if able! House Stark does have ways to capitalize on forcing both players to sacrifice a character— Robb Stark (Core Set, 146) and Catelyn Stark (Wolves of the North, 2) foremost among them. You may even be running a deck that tries to destroy your opponent’s board with The North Remembers (The Fall of Astapor, 42)—a deck where Ramsay Snow may add just enough pressure to break your opponent. Still, there are at least as many opportunities when you use Banner of the Wolf (Core Set, 203B) to bring Ramsay Snow over to House Lannister.

The Lannisters excel at killing off their opponent’s characters and shrinking the board. With cards like Ser Gregor Clegane (The King’s Peace, 49), Trial by Combat (Calm Over Westeros, 90), Tower of the Hand (Wolves of the North, 30), and Ser Ilyn Payne (True Steel, 109), it’s easy to see how you could destroy the bulk of your opponent’s forces in a single bloody challenges phase. With the recent release of Valar Dohaeris (The Archmaester’s Key, 20) reducing the average number of characters on the board, Ramsay Snow fits right in.

You certainly could pay the five gold to marshal Ramsay Snow—and there are undeniable advantages to playing Ramsay Snow in marshaling when you’re first player. If only one or two of your opponent’s characters are left, marshaling Ramsay Snow would make him sacrifice another character before he has the chance to marshal any protection. Still, why pay for what you could have for free? Harrenhal (For Family Honor, 50) can be used as a Challenges Action to drop any Lannister or House Bolton character into play for free, and Ramsay Snow is a perfect target. The character that you put into play with Harrenhal would ordinarily be killed at the end of the phase, but if you use Ramsay Snow’s ability to sacrifice himself, you’ve lost nothing, and you’re ready to play Ramsay Snow again the next time you draw him!

And there’s no reason to stop with Ramsay Snow either. Both Roose Bolton (Ghosts of Harrenhal, 81) and Dreadfort Maester (The Archmaester’s Key, 2) make perfect targets for Harrenhal, because they can sacrifice themselves before they would otherwise die at the end of the challenges phase. Between them, the Boltons can form a formidable ally for your House Lannister decks, and they grow even more powerful with the addition of their ancestral home, The Dreadfort (Kingsmoot, 42).

The Dreadfort, like Ramsay Snow, has limited usefulness in a traditional House Stark deck: after one of your characters is sacrificed, you can kneel The Dreadfort to stand a House Bolton or non-Stark character. In a Lannister Banner of the Wolf deck, however, where nearly every character would be House Bolton or non-Stark, The Dreadfort can let you get even more value out of your characters, potentially overcommitting to one challenge but standing one of your participating characters to shore up your defenses again. With two new cards joining their forces in this Chapter Pack, House Bolton undoubtedly merits consideration from any Lannister deck dedicated to wiping out your enemies.

Our Blades Are Sharp

With the new House Bolton cards of this Chapter Pack, you face two choices. Will you stay loyal to House Stark and your past loyalties, or will you forge a new alliance with your erstwhile enemies in a bloody bid for power?

Make your decision when you pick up your copy of Kingsmoot (GT25) at your local retailer or online through our webstore today!

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He's Going to Fight

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Published 17 January 2018 | Star Wars: Armada

He's Going to Fight

Chris Fritz on Admiral Raddus in Star Wars: Armada

“Rogue One, may the Force be with you.”
  
–Admiral Raddus, Rogue One

At the climax of Rogue One, three storylines are playing out simultaneously. One chronicles Jyn Erso and Cassian Andor’s heroic infiltration of the Imperial installation. The second follows their Rebel comrades as they wreak havoc outside the base, creating chaos and buying Jyn and Cassian the time they need to succeed. And the final storyline follows the Rebel fleet, providing orbital support and a chance to receive the transmission of the vital Death Star plans.

Those Rebel starships in orbit are under the command of Admiral Raddus—who’s coming soon to Star Wars™: Armada in the Profundity Expansion Pack. Today, guest writer Chris Fritz shares his thoughts on making Raddus shine in your Rebel fleet!

Chris Fritz on Admiral Raddus

Hey everyone! Those of you that hang around the online Star Wars: Armada community may know me as Truthiness. I’m a community blogger and gamer, focusing heavily on Star Wars: Armada, and I’m really excited that Fantasy Flight Games invited me to share my ramblings to the community at large. Those of you that follow me on the Steel Command blog know that I absolutely love theorizing and breaking down new and emerging fleet builds. Today, I have the pleasure of doing so for none other than Admiral Raddus.

First, I should address a little bit of my philosophy on fleet building. While some believe that fleets should be able to function independent of their commander, I firmly believe in starting with the commander and building the fleet around that central pillar. Sure, some commanders don’t really need this: Admiral Motti and Moff Jerjerrod generally work in pretty much any fleet. Many others, however, such as Admiral Ackbar and Mon Mothma, require a little more forethought and care when constructing their fleets. Do you really want a bunch of Nebulon-B frigates or Hammerheads with Admiral Ackbar? Are you going to take nothing but big ships with Mon Mothma? Of course not! That doesn’t make them bad commanders. It just means you have to plan a little more deliberately when you’re putting together your fleet.

With that philosophy in mind, let’s take a closer look at the topic of today’s article. Above all, Admiral Raddus shatters the normal deployment paradigm of Star Wars: Armada. Deployment can be critical to deciding the outcome of a game, and getting that last ship placement can be a major deciding factor. While a fleet with multiple small units might not care, deployment often makes or breaks large ships. If you deploy in the wrong position, you can end up out of the fight for critical turns or flying straight into a trap you can’t avoid. As such, players often load up on cheap squadrons and flotillas to pad deployments. That’s where Admiral Raddus comes crashing in out of nowhere to ruin your opponent’s best laid plans. With Raddus as your commander, you essentially guarantee that you get the last deployment, but without needing the usual investment. Squadron padding for deployment’s sake becomes unnecessary. Objectives like Solar Corona or Superior Positions don’t hold as much appeal for your own objective deck.

Raddus also changes normal activation dynamics. If you’ve been around Star Wars: Armada for a while, you’ll know that the number of activations on your side is a pretty big factor. Being able to guarantee the last activation and move your ship into perfect position without worrying about return fire is crucial. When combined with first player, it can be the deciding factor in a game. Just a single sequence of last activation followed by first activation with the same ship can swing the game.

Raddus changes that normal logic for one of your ships. Up until you use his ability, Raddus guarantees you could have the last say in positioning during any one round. Your opponent may have “out-activated” you, but because the ship brought in by Admiral Raddus comes in at the beginning of a round, you get to react to that final positioning. It only works for that one turn, but as I said, that can make all the difference. As second player, you can use that advantage to force the first player to choose between his planned first activation or getting smashed in the flank by your newly arrived ship. As first player, you may not get an immediate reward for your positioning, but you certainly will in subsequent turns.

My last major consideration with Raddus is really more about what isn’t in his limitations versus what is. Namely, there is no limitation on the size of the ship you bring in from hyperspace. If you’ve played an All Out Assault in The Corellian Conflict campaign expansion, you have an idea of how incredible it can be when a large ship hyperspace-jumps into the battlefield. Raddus gives you that advantage in every time. There is a little bit of a catch-22, though. To get the most out of your new ship’s placement, you want to throw a lot of points into a large ship equipped to cause maximum pain. However, you also want a good number of other ships in your fleet to maximize the flexibility of placing your ship that hyperspace-jumps into play. You may choose to use lots of flotillas and sacrifice ship-to-ship firepower, or you may skimp on squadrons and become more vulnerable to attack from your opponent’s squadrons. Both approaches have their risks and advantages.


Admiral Raddus brings in an MC80 Star Cruiser out of hyperspace to catch the Imperial fleet in the flank!

I find the best place to start when building an Admiral Raddus fleet is with that large ship. This ship will define your approach to the rest of your fleet. One of the most potent combinations I’ve seen is an MC80 Command Cruiser loaded up with upgrades: the Defiance title, Quad Battery Turrets, Leading Shots, Electronic Countermeasures, Flight Commander, and most importantly, Rapid Launch Bays. You then load up the Rapid Launch Bays with three B-Wing squadrons and a HWK-290. All put together, it unloads an absolutely hellish burst of firepower coming out of hyperspace, with little your opponent can do to stop it.

My personal favorite is using a MC80 Battle or Star Cruiser. While it won’t match the burst potential of the Defiance combination shown above, it has a long reach combined with good speed to keep up the pressure. An MC80 Battle Cruiser with Spinal Armaments, a Gunnery Team, and Leading Shots will spit out a lot of dice over a wide area, with Raddus giving you the perfect positioning.

From there, you just need to decide what your support ships are going to be. Because you want options for the hyperspace deployment, you need a fair number of ships. I set my personal minimum at four (not including the hyperspacing ship) to maintain maximum flexibility. That likely means you’re looking at Hammerheads, CR90s, and/or GR-75s. You need at least a Hammerhead to use as your flagship. After all, you can’t use Admiral Raddus if he’s not on the board and you can’t use a flotilla as his flagship. I find the support ships that you choose often depend heavily on how competitive you want to be in the squadron game. If you don’t mind going light on squadrons, you can grab more Hammerheads and CR90s to supplement your ship-to-ship firepower. Or, if you feel the need to maximize squadrons, you’ll gravitate toward flotillas and their cheap squadron activations. Here are a couple fleet builds with some of the above considerations:

Defiance

391/400 points

MC80 Command Cruiser
- Defiance
- Flight Commander
- Engine Techs
- Rapid Launch Bays
- Electronic Countermeasures
- Quad Battery Turrets
- Leading Shots

Hammerhead Torpedo Corvette
- Admiral Raddus
- External Racks

GR-75 Medium Transports
- Bomber Command Center

GR-75 Medium Transports
- Comms Net

GR-75 Medium Transports
- Bright Hope
- Toryn Farr

3x B-Wing Squadrons
1x HWK-290
2x A-Wing Squadrons
Shara Bey
Tycho Celchu

This fleet wants to play heavily in the squadron phase. Shara, Tycho and the A-wings are there to fend off enemy bombers. Meanwhile, Raddus drops in Defiance to gut the enemy fleet. This is a very “all or nothing” approach, but one that can work well if executed properly.

Liberty or Death

392/400

MC80 Battle Cruiser
- Raymus Antilles
- Gunnery Team
- Leading Shots
- Nav Team
- Spinal Armament
- XI7 Turbolasers

Hammerhead Torpedo Corvette
- Admiral Raddus
- External Racks
- Task Force Antilles

Hammerhead Torpedo Corvette
- External Racks
- Task Force Antilles

Hammerhead Torpedo Corvette
- External Racks
- Task Force Antilles

Hammerhead Torpedo Corvette
- External Racks
- Task Force Antilles

GR-75 Medium Transports
- Slicer Tools

Shara Bey
Tycho Celchu

This list illustrates the reverse approach, emphasizing ship-to-ship firepower and allocating a bare minimum of resources to manage the squadron fight. The abundance of Task Force Antilles titles will help mitigate some of the worst bomber attacks, but it still risks getting overwhelmed by squadrons. On the flip side, the MC80 Battle Cruiser brings a fearsome amount of consistent, long-range firepower that covers a large area.

Those two lists are just a small taste of the opportunities that Raddus opens up for Rebel players. Like you, I’m chomping at the bit for Wave VII, and I can sincerely say that the design team knocked this wave out of the park. Thank you all for reading!

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Scramble Airspeeders

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- 01-17-18 05:13 - 0 Antworten

Published 15 January 2018 | Star Wars: Legion

Scramble Airspeeders

Preview the T-47 Airspeeder Unit Expansion for Star Wars: Legion

“Are the speeders ready?”
  
–Han Solo, Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back

Land battles are an undeniable, unforgettable part of the Star Wars saga, as the soldiers of the Rebel Alliance and the Galactic Empire clash on the surface of planets like Scarif, Hoth, and Endor. These battles are rarely fought on the ground alone, however. Starfighters and airspeeders whip over soldiers’ heads, strafing the unfolding battle and cutting down infantry before they have a chance to return fire. Air superiority is a crucial advantage for any commander, and soon, the Rebellion will be able to rule the skies with the T-47 Airspeeder Unit Expansion for Star Wars™: Legion.

The T-47 Airspeeder Unit Expansion contains an unpainted, easily assembled T-47 airspeeder miniature with all the cards and tokens you need to play. Along with the AT-ST Unit Expansion, the T-47 Airspeeder Unit Expansion and six other expansions will be released simultaneously alongside the Star Wars: Legion Core Set. You can pre-order your copy of the T-47 Airspeeder Unit Expansion at your local retailer or online through our website today!

Rule the Skies

Like the AT-ST for the Imperial forces, the T-47 Airspeeder is a heavy unit—the first to become available to Rebel Alliance generals. These airspeeders were most famously used in the Battle of Hoth, using some unconventional tactics to foil the advancing Imperial walkers. Still, there’s no reason why you can’t transplant a few T-47 Airspeeders to other planets in your games of Star Wars: Legion.

As a heavy unit, you’re limited to having two T-47 Airspeeders in your army, and although their health isn’t nearly as high as the AT-ST, your opponent may still find that T-47 Airspeeders are hard to pin down. These airspeeders feature speed-three movement, and they must perform a free, compulsory move at the beginning of each activation. By moving across the battlefield so quickly, it can be hard for other units to keep your airspeeders within range. What’s more, the armor on a T-47 Airspeeder is thick enough that standard infantry armaments will be hard-pressed to pierce it. With the Armor keyword, all normal hits are canceled, leaving only critical hits able to stand a chance of causing lasting damage.

That’s not the end of the T-47 Airspeeder’s durability either. Your airspeeders are repulsor vehicles, flying above the battlefield, and they cannot be engaged in melee combat or affected by Blast attacks. Their sheer speed also gives them Cover 1, making them harder to hit as they dart around enemy forces. And as a final touch, these speeders also convert defense surges into blocks, improving the power of their white defense dice drastically.

Powerful defenses are helpful, but they aren’t going to win the game for you. In order to keep your opponent from claiming objectives, you’ll need to make some attacks. The T-47 Airspeeder is equipped with an Ap/11 Double Laser Cannon, firing powerful lasers from its front firing arc that can punch through an armored vehicle with the help of the Impact 3 keyword. These forward-facing laser cannons aren’t a T-47 Airspeeder’s only armaments, however. T-47 Airspeeders bear the Arsenal 2 keyword, which lets them attack with two weapons every time they attack. Of course, to make the most of that, you’ll need to equip a weapon into the T-47 Airspeeder’s hardpoint upgrade slot.

There are two options for a rear-facing gun that come in the T-47 Airspeeder Unit Expansion. The Ax-108 "Ground Buzzer" is a powerful strafing gun that’s excellent for taking shots at trooper units as you race past. On the other hand, you may wish to incapacitate your opponent’s vehicles with the Mo/Dk Power Harpoon.  When you choose to equip the Power Harpoon, you’ll be causing minimal damage. This weapon only rolls a single red attack die, and although it’s likely to hit, you’re still only cause one damage. Still, it has significant tactical applications: whenever you wound an enemy vehicle with this weapon, you can perform a pivot with that vehicle!

A pivot is a special type of move that vehicles can use to reposition. Vehicles are naturally less mobile than a squad of infantry, so instead of performing a move action, a vehicle may choose to pivot, rotating up to 90 degrees in either direction. When you hit an enemy vehicle—like the AT-ST—with the Mo/Dk Power Harpoon, you can perform a pivot with it, potentially spinning it to face in completely the wrong direction! This may even expose the AT-ST’s weakened rear arc to attack, adding insult to injury.


The T-47 Airspeeder successfully hits the AT-ST and uses the Mo/Dk Power Harpoon to force it to pivot away from the action!

If you’re flying T-47 Airspeeders as part of your army, you’ll want a real ace at the controls. Fortunately, the Rebellion has just the right ace in Wedge Antilles. Wedge Antilles is known as one of the greatest pilots of the Rebellion, and with his upgrade card, you can see how Wedge can push the limits of any repulsor vehicle. By using Wedge Antilles, you can take a free action to perform a Full Pivot—turning his vehicle up to 360 degrees, instead of just 90 degrees. With Wedge behind the controls, your airspeeder may race forward with its compulsory move, spin completely around, and immediately launch a devastating attack and continue its strafing run back along the enemy lines.

Let’s Take the Fight to Them

With a T-47 Airspeeder or two in your army, you’re not just taking the fight to the Empire. You’re challenging them to compete in an entirely new arena of war: the sky above the battlefield.

Pre-order your copy of the T-47 Airspeeder Unit Expansion (SWL09) at your local retailer or online through our website today and look for it to release alongside the Core Set! Stay tuned for more previews of the Star Wars: Legion Core Set and Unit Expansions.

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